(Taken with Instagram)

(Taken with Instagram)

exploringsounds:

Picture: Stephen Cornford „Binatone Galaxy“, Campbell Works, London, 2011© Stephen Cornford

Sound Art. Sound as a Medium of Art
“The exhibition ”Sound Art. Sound as a Medium of Art” presents for the first time the development of sound art in the 21th century at the ZKM | Media Museum and in a public space. From Futurism to Fluxus, through to Twitter sonifications, the ZKM charts the history of Sound Art during the 20th century. However, focus is placed on contemporary practices: with works from 90 artists from which approximately 30 new productions from recent years will be represented, the visitor gains insights into the unique sound cosmos of contemporary art. The sound world visualizes its own exhibition architecture, and the exhibition visitor himself becomes the generator of sounds.” (…)
“The exhibition, makes new sound perceptions not only experienceable in the museum: passers-by may encounter sounds in the three installations located in the forecourt of the ZKM and five installations in public areas around the city of Karlsruhe. In addition, a selected concert program with outstanding performative projects enriches the exhibition: LaMonte Young, Xenakis, Cage and Ryoji Ikeda are representative of the program’s broad spectrum.”
You can visit the exhibition at ZKM - Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie Karlsruhe until January 06th, 2013.For further information, please visit the ZKM website.

exploringsounds:

Picture: Stephen Cornford „Binatone Galaxy“, Campbell Works, London, 2011
© Stephen Cornford


Sound Art. Sound as a Medium of Art

“The exhibition ”Sound Art. Sound as a Medium of Art” presents for the first time the development of sound art in the 21th century at the ZKM | Media Museum and in a public space. From Futurism to Fluxus, through to Twitter sonifications, the ZKM charts the history of Sound Art during the 20th century. However, focus is placed on contemporary practices: with works from 90 artists from which approximately 30 new productions from recent years will be represented, the visitor gains insights into the unique sound cosmos of contemporary art. The sound world visualizes its own exhibition architecture, and the exhibition visitor himself becomes the generator of sounds.” (…)

“The exhibition, makes new sound perceptions not only experienceable in the museum: passers-by may encounter sounds in the three installations located in the forecourt of the ZKM and five installations in public areas around the city of Karlsruhe. In addition, a selected concert program with outstanding performative projects enriches the exhibition: LaMonte Young, Xenakis, Cage and Ryoji Ikeda are representative of the program’s broad spectrum.”

You can visit the exhibition at ZKM - Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie Karlsruhe until January 06th, 2013.
For further information, please visit the ZKM website.

(Source: vimeo.com)

The WIRE Salon / Sounding out the Territory: the Sensorial World of Sound Maps: 15 March 2012
Thursday 15th March 2012

Door Times : 8pm
£4 on the door

Maps are systems for ordering and orienting ourselves within a landscape. Visual maps shape our ideas of both the physical and virtual world, but they can also distort perception to fit the agendas they serve, whether economic, cultural, religious or political. Maps reinforce borders and carve up and colonise public space and activity. They obscure and misrepresent, as much as they explain and illuminate, the stratified contours of 21st century topographies.Sound maps sidestep the compromised schematics of visual mapping by prioritising the sonification of urban and rural environments, dissolving artificial borders and reasserting the audio dimensions of the public sphere. Using techniques developed by field and location recordists, and combining them with online and mobile communications technologies, sound maps correct our perception of the world and reveal new realms of sonic activity. Where visual maps erase sensorial information, dividing space into discreet zones that isolate human experience, sound maps shake apart that zoning, paving the way for a new generation of DIY cartographers, architects and artists to expand our understanding of urban communities, the natural world, even historical epochs, outer space and the forces of globalisation, by perceptualising data as sound. In this edition of The Wire Salon, artist Kathy Hinde, Ian Rawes of the London Sound Survey, and Joseph Kohlmaier of London Metropolitan University’s Department of Architecture and Spatial Design will debate the philosophies and practices of sound mapping, exploring both its limits and potentiality. The discussion will be illustrated with audio and visual clips. Plus: a special audience-participation sound map quiz. Prizes will be awarded! "[A sound map] reaches across the city’s geographic, economic, educational, cultural and racial divides. It is at once a historical record and a subjective representation of the city. It is what each user wishes it to be and it is ever growing, ever changing and totally interactive." – NY Sound Map "Amongst the urban hubbub there’s information about who lives here, what they get up to, how they enjoy themselves and what they believe in. Sounds come in fashions from singing canaries and windchimes to car horns that play Old Dixie. They announce developments in technology, the city’s growth, and social and demographic change. They tell us of shifts in the make-up and scattering of London’s wildlife. Listening to a recording of the sounds of a place or event gets the imagination working and recreates some of the sense of being there.” – London Sound Survey London Sound SurveyKathy Hinde’s Echo Location projectMUSARC 

The WIRE Salon / Sounding out the Territory: the Sensorial World of Sound Maps: 15 March 2012

Thursday 15th March 2012

Door Times : 8pm

£4 on the door

Maps are systems for ordering and orienting ourselves within a landscape. Visual maps shape our ideas of both the physical and virtual world, but they can also distort perception to fit the agendas they serve, whether economic, cultural, religious or political. Maps reinforce borders and carve up and colonise public space and activity. They obscure and misrepresent, as much as they explain and illuminate, the stratified contours of 21st century topographies.

Sound maps sidestep the compromised schematics of visual mapping by prioritising the sonification of urban and rural environments, dissolving artificial borders and reasserting the audio dimensions of the public sphere. 

Using techniques developed by field and location recordists, and combining them with online and mobile communications technologies, sound maps correct our perception of the world and reveal new realms of sonic activity. Where visual maps erase sensorial information, dividing space into discreet zones that isolate human experience, sound maps shake apart that zoning, paving the way for a new generation of DIY cartographers, architects and artists to expand our understanding of urban communities, the natural world, even historical epochs, outer space and the forces of globalisation, by perceptualising data as sound. 

In this edition of The Wire Salon, artist Kathy Hinde, Ian Rawes of the London Sound Survey, and Joseph Kohlmaier of London Metropolitan University’s Department of Architecture and Spatial Design will debate the philosophies and practices of sound mapping, exploring both its limits and potentiality. The discussion will be illustrated with audio and visual clips. 

Plus: a special audience-participation sound map quiz. Prizes will be awarded! 

"[A sound map] reaches across the city’s geographic, economic, educational, cultural and racial divides. It is at once a historical record and a subjective representation of the city. It is what each user wishes it to be and it is ever growing, ever changing and totally interactive." – NY Sound Map 

"Amongst the urban hubbub there’s information about who lives here, what they get up to, how they enjoy themselves and what they believe in. Sounds come in fashions from singing canaries and windchimes to car horns that play Old Dixie. They announce developments in technology, the city’s growth, and social and demographic change. They tell us of shifts in the make-up and scattering of London’s wildlife. Listening to a recording of the sounds of a place or event gets the imagination working and recreates some of the sense of being there.” – London Sound Survey 

London Sound Survey
Kathy Hinde’s Echo Location project
MUSARC 

(via Katie Paterson, Langjökull, Snæfellsjökull, Solheimajökull)
Sound recordings from three glaciers in Iceland, pressed into three records, cast, and frozen with the meltwater from each of these glaciers, and played on three turntables until they completely melt. The records were played once and now exist as three digital films. The turntables begin playing together, and for the first ten minutes as the needles trace their way around, the sounds from each glacier merge in and out with the sounds the ice itself creates. The needle catches on the last loop, and the records play for nearly two hours, until completely melted.

(via Katie Paterson, Langjökull, Snæfellsjökull, Solheimajökull)

Sound recordings from three glaciers in Iceland, pressed into three records, cast, and frozen with the meltwater from each of these glaciers, and played on three turntables until they completely melt. The records were played once and now exist as three digital films. The turntables begin playing together, and for the first ten minutes as the needles trace their way around, the sounds from each glacier merge in and out with the sounds the ice itself creates. The needle catches on the last loop, and the records play for nearly two hours, until completely melted.

Tactical Sound Garden [ TSG ] Toolkit
Given the ubiquity of mobile devices and wireless networks, and their proliferation throughout increasingly diverse and sometimes unexpected urban sites, what opportunities - and dilemmas - emerge for the design of public space in contemporary cities?
The Tactical Sound Garden [TSG] Toolkit is an open source software platform for cultivating public “sound gardens” within contemporary cities. It draws on the culture of urban community gardening to posit a participatory environment where new spatial practices for social interaction within technologically mediated environments can be explored and evaluated. Addressing the impact of mobile audio devices like the iPod, the project examines gradations of privacy and publicity within contemporary public space.
The Toolkit enables anyone living within dense 802.11 wireless (WiFi) “hot zones” to install a “sound garden” for public use. Using a WiFi enabled mobile device (PDA, laptop, mobile phone), participants “plant” sounds within a positional audio environment. These plantings are mapped onto the coordinates of a physical location by a 3D audio engine common to gaming environments - overlaying a publicly constructed soundscape onto a specific urban space. Wearing headphones connected to a WiFi enabled device, participants drift though virtual sound gardens as they move throughout the city.

Tactical Sound Garden [ TSG ] Toolkit

Given the ubiquity of mobile devices and wireless networks, and their proliferation throughout increasingly diverse and sometimes unexpected urban sites, what opportunities - and dilemmas - emerge for the design of public space in contemporary cities?

The Tactical Sound Garden [TSG] Toolkit is an open source software platform for cultivating public “sound gardens” within contemporary cities. It draws on the culture of urban community gardening to posit a participatory environment where new spatial practices for social interaction within technologically mediated environments can be explored and evaluated. Addressing the impact of mobile audio devices like the iPod, the project examines gradations of privacy and publicity within contemporary public space.

The Toolkit enables anyone living within dense 802.11 wireless (WiFi) “hot zones” to install a “sound garden” for public use. Using a WiFi enabled mobile device (PDA, laptop, mobile phone), participants “plant” sounds within a positional audio environment. These plantings are mapped onto the coordinates of a physical location by a 3D audio engine common to gaming environments - overlaying a publicly constructed soundscape onto a specific urban space. Wearing headphones connected to a WiFi enabled device, participants drift though virtual sound gardens as they move throughout the city.

Eliane Radigue in London

The first major retrospective of the work of the seminal Eliane Radigue, in London, 6th - 26th June 2011. Including the excellent ‘Jetsun Mila’.

(Source: sidvoltersound)